Newsletters

13% Increase in Productivity

»Posted on Sep 26, 2017 in Engagement, Performance | 0 comments

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business’ five-year study of nearly 24,000 workers and almost 2,000 bosses resulted in 6 million measurements to determine the impact of management on productivity. Each worker averaged four managers a year to determine the outcomes from a good manager contrasted with a poor manager.  The findings revealed a 13% increase in productivity when replacing a poor manager with a good manager. Being a good manager is complex, requiring several skillsets and perhaps most of all is self- awareness.  According to a recent Gallup poll, 75% of respondents reported experiencing abusive behavior at work sometime in their career; of people who quit their jobs, at least 50% quit because of their bosses; and 70% of ...

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Social Media Vigilantes

»Posted on Aug 28, 2017 in Compliance, Mitigating Liability | 0 comments

A Twitter account @YesYoureRacist started after the march in Charlottesville to solicit the identities of those who were photographed marching in the Unite the Right rally. The social media campaign used those identities to encourage employers of the protesters to terminate the protesters’ employment.  It wasn’t just Cole White who was identified and lost his job due to this social media campaign. His well-documented story presents an example for employers. The Top Dog restaurant in California denied firing White. Their statement to the Washington Post said Cole voluntarily resigned and we accepted his resignation. It went on to say, “We do respect our employees’ rights to their opinions. They are free to make their own choices...

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521% Return On Investment

»Posted on Jul 24, 2017 in Compliance, Mitigating Liability, Performance | 0 comments

U.S. employers spend between $70 and $164 billion annually on training and development according to a number of surveys. The most influential factor in a company’s training budget is the company’s size.  Those with 10,000 or more employees average $13 million for training. Training Magazine, the Association for Talent Development and many others have conducted studies to evaluate the return on investment (ROI) of training. As a result, we learned instructor-led classroom training is the most used and is the second most effective method despite all the advancements in training technology and the use of social media. Coaching and mentoring are the most effective methods of training. Two lessons learned; it takes people to effectively train...

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Finding Time

»Posted on Jun 26, 2017 in Engagement, Performance | 0 comments

Peter Drucker identified a shift in work from muscle to mind in the late 1950’s which led to the term knowledge worker.  Many knowledge workers stay after work, arrive early or work at home to find time to think about what needs to be done, or give a project the deep thought it requires. One reason people are working outside of work hours is work hours are consumed by meetings. Meetings are necessary and effective when well run. Even when meetings are well run, too many or poorly timed meetings result in wasted time. In a typical meeting, three people do 70% of the talking. Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking encouraged introverts to prepare for what they want to say in meetings and...

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The Cost of Distraction

»Posted on May 24, 2017 in Civility, Newsletters, Performance | 0 comments

Working in an environment with competing objectives under tight deadlines and fear of punishment is a too common description of work today. A few high stress occupations are challenging whether the results of job stress (i.e. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) qualifies as Worker’s Compensation claims.  The British Medical Journal linked job stress to cardio-vascular disease in 2002; American studies recently validated this information. Chronic stress increases cortisol which creates inflammation and is linked to disease. Previously blaming the person’s reaction to stress (i.e. the Type A personality), now findings reveal organizations can make changes to reduce stress.  An individual’s response to a situation has a lot to do with ...

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